Every animal in the ocean is vulnerable but seeing seabird chicks with their stomachs full of plastic was heart-breaking. (2)
Every animal in the ocean is vulnerable but seeing seabird chicks with their stomachs full of plastic was heart-breaking. (8)
Every animal in the ocean is vulnerable but seeing seabird chicks with their stomachs full of plastic was heart-breaking. (7)
Every animal in the ocean is vulnerable but seeing seabird chicks with their stomachs full of plastic was heart-breaking. (1)
Every animal in the ocean is vulnerable but seeing seabird chicks with their stomachs full of plastic was heart-breaking. (4)

Welcome to Cornwall Green Schools! This is where we share how schools in Cornwall are working together for a greener, cleaner, fairer future.

Every school in Cornwall has signed up to a Green Charter for Schools

The Green Charter commits all Cornwall’s schools to working together for a greener, cleaner, fairer future. Being greener together means being part of a bigger community. Across Cornwall’s schools we are educating children and young people about climate change, empowering them to take action to tackle it.

“Everyone is responsible for our planet as no one owns it. We just inhabit it, and it is our responsibility to safeguard the future of our earth for future generations. Our global community is obsessed with profit and consumerism. World leaders should be thinking about the environment, not the economy, because as it has been said before – There is no Planet B!” – Emily S, Penrice Academy.

G7 Summit: what do we think our world leaders should be talking about? 2021 is the year that Cornwall is hosting the G7 Summit. Here are some of the global priorities our students identified at the Cornwall Schools’ Eco Conference on 7 June:

“We need to change the school curriculum quickly enough to educate and introduce young people into a world where it is normal for everyone to care about other people and the environment and to act to safeguard it.”

“Locally, we need to rethink how agriculture works with nature. Globally, governments need to act more on the climate emergency. Eliminate agribusiness and unethical farming practice. Attack the big multinational corporations who are the culprits of exploitation of resources – they prioritise profits before people and planet.”

“We think world leaders should be discussing plastic pollution in the oceans and how this is affecting the ocean wildlife. Overfishing is a huge problem which leads to habitat loss and mass extinction of underwater populations.”

“Wealthier nations which produce and consume the most should take responsibility for their actions. Not just G7 – all G20. And why are we dumping our recycling on other countries like Turkey where it might just be burnt?”

“Big Business needs to change. Individuals are responsible but we can only make small changes. Large corporations and factories account for a huge amount of pollution. It is the politicians who hold the power of legislation to change the bad habits of these companies. Tax them on plastic use. Big companies like Amazon should be paying their fair share of tax anyway.

We are in the middle of a climate emergency and a major re-alignment of values. Young activists like Greta Thunberg, and the millions of people they inspire, are campaigning aggressively to bring about political and social change in order to help save our planet. The mobilisation of young people is one of the strongest catalysts to force politicians to understand that things have to change.

“Being in a changemaker role is exciting and optimistic. Knowing you are part of something bigger kind of gives you a certain liberty.” – Student Delegate, Cornwall Schools’ Eco Conference 2021

Cornwall’s schools: working together for a greener, cleaner, fairer future.